114| Richard Firth (British, b. 1971)

American Yacht Yankee Joins The Big Class On British Waters, 1935 – Britannia, Westward, Yankee

Oil on canvas, 30" x 50"

30000 - 40000

Signed In 1930 Yankee was launched as one of four J-Class yachts builtto defend the America's Cup. Designed by Frank Paine andlaunched from Lawley & Sons yard in Bristol, Connecticut, the Yankee was regarded as the best all-rounder of the four. Notquite as fine-tuned as the others, she lost out, and with slightmodifications came back to compete for the defender spot againin 1934. Losing again, she was sold by her original ownershipsyndicate, which included former Secretary of the Navy andAmerica's Cup Hall of Fame member Charles Francis AdamsIII, to Gerald Lambert. Lambert took her across the Atlantic torace in England where she became the only American J-Classyacht to do so. In 32 races in England she had eight first-placefinishes before being scrapped in 1941 with proceeds going tothe war effort.Britannia was built for King Edward VII and then served forKing George V. Launched in 1893, she had perhaps the mostsuccessful racing yacht career of all time. In 635 starts, shewon 231 first prizes and 129 other prizes before being scuttledin 1936 in accordance with George V's dying wish for her tofollow him to his grave.Launched in 1910, Westward was a superstar of the golden ageof big-class racing. The largest Class-A racing schooner of hertime, Westward was hailed by author Peter Heaton as "perhaps the most famous of all racing schooners." She met Britannia no fewer than 174 times and George V was once heard to declare "Whatever we do to Britannia, we must beat that damned schooner, referring to Westward

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