Man o’ War

55| Richard Stone Reeves (American, 1910-2005)

Man o’ War

Starting bid: $10,000.00

Signed & Inscribed

Oil on board, 11" x 14"

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$20000 - $25000

When Man o' War sold at the Saratoga sales for $5,000, the man bidding that day on behalf of Samuel D. Riddle was Ed Buhler, the uncle of Richard Stone Reeves. Reeves said that this bit of knowledge when he was young "My uncle bought Man o' War" - led directly to his association with Thoroughbreds.

"It was," Reeves says, "a very special thrill when the publishers commissioned me to paint Man o' War for Classic Lines. I had gathered reference material since I was a boy. It was almost as if I had been practicing all my life for that one painting." - Richard Stone Reeves, Classic Lines, page 95. Man O' War was bred by August Belmont, Jr at his Nursery Stud in Kentucky. Shortly after Man O' War was foaled, Belmont, Jr. enlisted in the United States Army to serve in France during World War I and while overseas, his wife named the foal Man O' War in honor of her husband. The Belmonts intended to race Man O' War themselves, but Belmont, Jr. was so absorbed with his wartime tasks?given the responsibility of supplying horses to the troops in Europe?he decided to sell their 21 yearlings at auction in Saratoga Springs, New York. Samuel D. Riddle purchased Man O' War for the sum of $5,000. Nicknamed ?Big Red,? the high-headed chestnut son of Fair Play went on to win 20 of 21 starts and was considered a champion at 2 and 3 as well as Horse of the Year in 1920. Man o? War was a leading sire, and his influence on American breeding was immense. Man O' War is widely considered one of the greatest racing horses of all time and in 1920 was The New York Times outstanding athlete of the year alongside Babe Ruth. Man o' War was retired by his owner Sam Riddle after his perfect Horse of the Year three-year-old campaign. In 1921 Man o' War started his stud duties at Hinata Farm outside of Lexington, which was managed by Elizabeth Daingerfield. The next year he was moved to Riddle's new farm, Faraway Farm. Here Man o' War became a Kentucky tourist attraction.

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